marketing

The 4-types of people you’ll work with

The 4-types of people you'll work with

George Lois sums it up nicely here in his book “Damn Good Advice (For people with talent)” – God knows I’ve come across all four of these and the only one that scares me is the fourth. We’ve all worked with plenty of people who don’t much and don’t want to do much – easy enough, they’ll just sit there. No worries. But the ignorant and industrious? God help us all.
If you can’t educate the #4, then attempt to re-purpose them. If that doesn’t work, get rid of them. If you work for them, and none of those have worked, find a new gig!

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It’s where the future is going with Social Media

It’s where the future is going with Social Media

Mastercard HQ social media conversation monitors - very cool.

Mastercard HQ social media conversation monitors – very cool.

You can’t influence the conversation if you didn’t attend the party. Social media is ONLY a conversation among a ton of people and anyone is free to join. A brand can’t shout from the corner of the room, or outside the house where the conversation is taking place, about how great they are. Imagine if a person did that. They have to discuss and engage and be witty and charming and admit mistakes and you know, be a decent human being. That’s what a brand is these days, a person – but the question is, are they a person we like? Do we trust them? Do we believe them?

I defend Verizon like my best friend. I’ve been with them for 16 years (since PrimeCo!) and no matter what wrong someone (rarely) may claim they did to them, I don’t care in the least. I’ve had too many great (not just good, but GREAT) experiences with them that, short of slapping me in the face during their be-speckled mascot’s, in-progress robbery of my home, I’m going to have their back. ┬áCan you hear me now?

Like the “Tipping Point” but, you know, with Science.

Did you like Malcolm Gladwell’s “Tipping Point” or Dan & Chip Heath’s “Made to Stick?” You did? Both, are totally great works that opened our eyes to how ideas get spread. Of the two, “Made to Stick” was the better manual for attributing what is “sticky” vs. what is passably interesting.

Now, Professor Jonah Berger has codified why certain things go viral in a way that does much more to explain the phenomenon than these earlier works. I really can’t wait to try out this process and see how we can best apply it to our product.

I’ll be presenting this video and materials tomorrow in our Leadership Series (held bi-weekly) with all of our Managers and we’re going to try the workbook on making things contagious. It’s available when you subscribe to the Prof’s blog at http://www.JonahBerger.com – which is totally worth it.

If we’re successful applying the principles to our business, I’ll be sure to share the results and give you some step-by-step insight into what worked and how we got there. I think this is going to be one of the easiest to implement processes we’ve encountered yet.