Videos

There are no cats in America?

Our futures are like this – devoid of risk or threat, far sunnier than our ravaged pasts. We can place our hopes there, safely, for we know that in the future all will be right.

The sad fact is that there are cats in America, and in our futures. All the singing in the world won’t get rid of them or change the fact that tough challenges lay ahead, wherever we are going.

This isn’t to say we shouldn’t go there because of the cats – we should. But probably with both eyes open, and a little wary of the streets actually being paved with cheese.

What are your cats? Where are you going? What’s the plan? What are you overlooking through overly optimistic eyes?

Like the “Tipping Point” but, you know, with Science.

Did you like Malcolm Gladwell’s “Tipping Point” or Dan & Chip Heath’s “Made to Stick?” You did? Both, are totally great works that opened our eyes to how ideas get spread. Of the two, “Made to Stick” was the better manual for attributing what is “sticky” vs. what is passably interesting.

Now, Professor Jonah Berger has codified why certain things go viral in a way that does much more to explain the phenomenon than these earlier works. I really can’t wait to try out this process and see how we can best apply it to our product.

I’ll be presenting this video and materials tomorrow in our Leadership Series (held bi-weekly) with all of our Managers and we’re going to try the workbook on making things contagious. It’s available when you subscribe to the Prof’s blog at http://www.JonahBerger.com – which is totally worth it.

If we’re successful applying the principles to our business, I’ll be sure to share the results and give you some step-by-step insight into what worked and how we got there. I think this is going to be one of the easiest to implement processes we’ve encountered yet.

Sense Memories of Falling in Love

This album dropped just over 20 years ago and I was beyond head-over-heals with my longest term of High School girlfriends. This song “Fade into you” perfectly transports me back to my wistful days as a heart-achy youth, just marinating in the brain chemicals of being so smitten. If it wasn’t for work and school, I’d have lounged around all Heroin-addict-style on the crazy high of just… are you digging this air?!?

What’s so funny about this, is it’s only the songs Unpopularity that has managed to perfectly preserve this sense memory of that time and place. If it was anything else, I would have heard it over the years at parties and on the radio and the context of it would have changed. No, this was the exact sound of being just, obsessed with another human being. The sound of endless devotion and bottomless despair for the fact that it wouldn’t last.

We get fewer and fewer of these moments as we go on, while conversely, Gen Y & Z will have more of these sense memory moments. Growing up with the internet means you can find the weird and obscure and the art that perfectly speaks to you. Popular culture has never, at any time, had more AND less draw on people than it does now. Our lives we live in public are more shared than ever, while our private lives are more private too.

Ask anyone 35 and older what song they fell in love to, and ask the same of a 16-year old today. Odds are that everyone knows the first song, I bet you few know the later. What was yours?

Dan Pink: The Puzzle of Motivation TED talk

This is an absolute classic and one that has helped me decide what kind of work I most enjoy doing. The three keys towards fulfilling, cognitive work, are (summarized briefly):
*Autonomy – Do you control a majority of your time at work and what you’re working on?
*Mastery – Are you doing something you can get better at?
*Purpose – Do you feel like you’re a part of something larger than yourself?

These have been guide posts for me for the last three years since I first saw Mr. Pink spell out what I’d long suspected. My quarterly bonus of thousands of dollars as a Regional Manager wasn’t nearly as motivating to me as was the joy of helping one of my Managers succeed, or creating some new metric/model/marketing platform that would help propel our success. Sure, I love money, but I love my team and the thrill of winning a lot more. Especially when I get to create and collaborate in order to get there.

Give this a view and really check your current motivations for why you do what you do. Are you propelled by your bonus potential, or possessed by your passion?

Simon Sinek – Your job is to take care of your team.

Great video of Simon Sinek talking about the Circle of Safety – why we should take care of one another and why it’s a leaders highest obligation to make sure that they take care of their team. It’s a shame I missed this as it was filmed in downtown Gainesville.

You Can Never Go Home Again…

There’s something great about that. You lived it once and that’s all you’re going to get it. God! You wish maybe you could go back and do that one thing differently and yet…

Don’t do that.

It happened. And it’s great. Or not. Doesn’t really matter at this point. It happened and that’s that.

So what’s the take away? What now?

You know that this isn’t how it ends. You know you’ve likely got (god willing) another 40-50-80 years to finish this run. How does your earlier experience influence your future behavior?

I miss old friends with the gravity of a dwarf star. Hell, I miss current friends the same. I don’t want to go through that again. I know what I want my future to look like: I want to look back and see myself reading to my kids after a LONG day. So, I read to them after a LONG day. I want to look back and see that I took the chances I needed to in order to start my own thing – because that’s what was needed to be happy. I didn’t “wait” because something was going to “happen” – whenever that is.

2002 was awesome. I’d love to spend a week there. So was 93′ and 05′ but that doesn’t mean we can live in space we already did. We have a new one of those every moment – RIGHT NOW. So what do you want your future self to say about this moment.

Would you want to go back to “right now?”

What all Great Leaders Do…

Simon Sinek gives about the best description I’ve ever seen on the powerful effects of Trust.

I really don’t want to say too much here, best just to take a little while to listen to this while you’re typing and soak it in.

Thank God It’s Monday! No, Seriously…

I have a confession: I love Mondays. Yeah, you heard it – Mondays rule.

Mondays suck for some people. They used to suck for me. I first learned “TGIF” when I was in elementary school. First heard my parents play drive-time afternoon radio on the way home from school about how awesome it was that one didn’t have to work for two days. It seemed, well… normal.

If you work for someone else and you view your work as something that’s just a requirement and not a huge opportunity, then TGIF makes sense as a mantra. Me? I’d prefer not to go through life that way and you don’t have to either.

Hat tip to Eric Thomas (the super intense guy in this video) for coining the alternate term, “TGIM.” If you haven’t seen his other videos, I highly recommend them as opposed to a shot of 5-hour energy. His passion is infectious and worthy of imitation. If you care about being the best version of yourself possible, then this is what you need to get behind. To hell with YOLO, all you need to know is that Monday is the starting gun of awesomeness.

Monday is where you get to shake off two days of lethargy and open up an early lead on the rest of the pack. Well rested, you can hunker down and attack the week, making Friday hope you never arrive for when you do, you’ll surely slay it with the intensity of an apex predator.

Any work, even work for someone else, should be in the service of your ultimate goals. Where do you want to go and who do you want to be? Working gets us there and Monday is a damn fine place to start. Fridays often piss me off as I wish I had another day to get more done in that week. In fact, regardless of how much we got done, another day would always be welcome. Monday guarantees you four more whereas Friday promises none.

JFK once said, “Don’t pray for easier lives, pray to be stronger men.” With the same sentiment, don’t wish for easier days, wish for greater opportunity – and nothing has more opportunity in it than a Monday morning, pregnant with possibility.

You were in Vietnam?

As usual, Seth Godin’s blog delivers succinct brilliance. Today’s is about the quickest way to bring about change, which he relays within three points. Spoilers: the answer is not electing someone to the Presidency.

Coming up in the Student Housing Industry in Gainesville (Go Gators), I worked as a Community Manager for an outfit that had 24 other such managers in the same market. We all managed similar assets (more or less) and were nearly exclusively in our early/mid-twenties. As such, we were eager to make names for ourselves and vault up the hierarchy. Competition was rampant and ruled the day – though it was nearly always friendly – akin to sibling rivalry. Read: A fun place to work.

As you’d expect; a few of us were terrible each year, most were average, and a few were incredible successes. I’m happy to report I was always in that last group – the ones who won every single year, in the country’s toughest Student Housing market.

To put it in perspective: if Student Housing is the Vietnam war – working in Gainesville is being in the shit.

When we’d get together after hours or at events, other Managers in the second group (average) would lament to me that I always got whatever I asked for – in regards to permission for certain types of promotions or money for improvements.

Nothing could have been further from the truth. I learned after the first year to never ask for anything. When you ask permission you give people the chance to say no. After all, saying ‘no’ insures you don’t screw something up and waste time or money by doing something new – and by definition – unproven. Saying ‘yes’ means you could fall on your face and they’d be blamed for authorizing your blunder. Guess which response got chosen almost reflexively?

That’s when I let them know that I just did what I thought best for the company and for my asset.

If I knew a “Cooler-Scooter” was going to draw attention on campus and actually make my Leasing people want to flyer (thus increasing our success in leading traffic to the property) then what was the big deal? Spend the $500. But what if someone got hurt? Are you kidding me?!

That was the part that they couldn’t get comfortable with. They wanted the blessing and the political cover to do what they thought best without any possible blow back if it pulled a giant Hindenburg. No risk – all reward. Life doesn’t work that way.

Here’s my spin on Seth’s advice:

Don’t demand the power or ask permission – just do what needs doing and make sure it falls in line with your company’s culture and beliefs.
Take the Responsibility for what happens next – if you decide to spend money on a marketing venture and it doesn’t bear fruit, own that and state what you’d do differently.
If you succeed in your venture you won’t be alone. “Success has a thousand fathers, Failure is an orphan.” Share the parentage with anyone who helped or assisted and be gracious. People will let you get away with being the Maverick if they know you’re not going rouge and losing touch with the greater team.

Probably the biggest thing I’ve failed to mention is that you have to believe in what you’re doing, overpoweringly so. If you owned the company and this was your money at play, would you do the same? If you hesitate even an instant in answering that question, slow down. Stop. There’s always tomorrow.